10 Products & Practices I’ve Abandoned & Why

Dude’s always delivering great videos, and this is no exception!

In this video he emphasizes several key composting points that I fully agree with:

1) Tilling – 0:30
2) Growing in Rows – 1:52
3) Synthetic Fertilizer – 2:35
4) Store Bought Compost – 3:30
5) Store Bought Organic Fertilizer – 4:17
6) Rock Dust – 5:04
7) Biochar – 6:10
8) Comfrey Tea – 7:27
9) Compost Tea – 8:22
10) Turning Compost Frequently – 9:15

Summer Worm Composting: So Far, So Good

I’ve been enjoying the Worm Inn Mega this summer with no issues, and it’s simply due to having ample cover material.

The Worm Inn Mega is big enough for there to be plenty of cover material to begin with…you can really load it up to prevent flying pests and also keep the worms busy.

I actually have a hard time filling it up because the worms are just mowing through the material- Capacity really makes the whole process a lot easier.

I just realized that you might not have heard about this system…

Have you seen the Worm Inn Mega yet?  Check out my dorky review below for more information… this is my top recommendation for those of you out there looking to compost at home but lack the outdoor space.

Vermicomposting made simple.

Click here to learn more about the Worm Inn Mega system.

 

Do You Love Your Trash Can?

trash can composter

Wow, I started this thing over a year ago and I still haven’t filled it up.

While I usually add to my big cubic yard sized bin, the can’s been getting attention too.

How is this working?  Honestly, I was surprised this system would work this well due to its limited size.

Then I remembered that it’s basically the same capacity as a compost tumbler, without the tumbling function…which isn’t needed.

My major finding is that simply leaving the lid off and getting it soaked every few days is enough to keep this thing going smoothly.

Dry piles are slow piles, and compost craves moisture- I found that the warmer months dried out my can quicker with the lid on…try it out- pests aren’t an issue with this system.

If you’re a semi-regular reader of the site or viewer of my videos, you’ll know what I’m going to say next-

Cover your food scraps!  Each time you add food scraps, cover them up with a layer of browns.  That’s it- the earth’s oldest process is hassle-free.

City Composting: Try the Alley?

philly alley

I walked around in this alley and had a look inside all of the trash cans.

The majority were for recyclables, but the ones that were trash, were mostly organic materials… this is going to be the case if you don’t compost.

Notice how much of a mess this alley is?  It smelled pretty rank, too.

Not that I care it smells, but the smells could be completely avoided by adding a trash can of another kind used for compost.

This alley is one block from a public park full of leaves and dead plants (cover materials).  Get creative and divert your organics…I promise you it isn’t hard, and the rewards are beyond satisfying.

 

Composting Citrus: Yay or Nay?

Yay!

I don’t know where this myth originally started, but my only guess is that it might relate to vermicomposting… too much citrus waste (or plenty of other things) all at one time can be detrimental to your worm population.

As for plain ol’ composting, add all the citrus you want!  The key is simply adding TWICE as much brown material as food scraps.

Yes, that’s it- As long as you’re composting correctly, you will NOT have any issues with any food scraps, including citrus scraps.

Give it a shot- composting is easier than you think!

How to Compost Weeds

Can you compost weeds, even if they’ve gone to seed?  The answer is yes, but there’s a few things to consider:

1) If you have a compost bin that’s 1 cubic yard or greater, your pile should have no issues heating up to the temperatures needed to kill weed seeds (131F for 3 days).  I add to one bin for a year before letting it sit for a year…plenty of time.

2) If you’re working with a smaller compost system such as a trash can shown in this video, it will not be able to generate the necessary heat to kill weed seeds.

Try letting them sit for a few days to dry out.  Once they’re dry, add all the thin brown stuff to your compost pile.  Put your thicker stems off to the side for now.

Weeds are organic material, therefore they will compost- the key is just knowing how to add them, depending on your setup.

Are You Composting Yet?

Did you watch any TV today?  Yesterday?  This week?

If so, were there any commercials?

In the time it took for the three commercials to whizz by, you could have emptied your kitchen food scrap collector into your backyard trash can composter and cut your landfilling in half.

No, really- drill holes in a trash can, fill it halfway with ripped up leaves and dead plants, then add your food scraps.  Finish it off by covering them with another layer of leaves.  Add some water, then go inside.

Hit the pause button again and continue watching Game of Thrones.  I guess most people don’t actually watch TV anymore right?  Now it’s all internet and you can pause everything and skip commercials and stuff… well, you get the point!

Five minutes a week and you’re doing something in your backyard that’s as important, if not more important, than recycling.

Take the future into your own hands and tell your friends you’re cutting down your emissions, creating soil, and cutting your landfill contributions in half.  The Earth’s oldest process sure is a lot of fun.

Composting Made Simple.