Best Source of Carbon for Composting in a City Without Trees & Leaves

I’m very lucky that although I live in an urban area, I have trees that drop tons of leaves right outside my door.

If you’re not this lucky, you may have to go out hunting for leaves…they work better than any other material for balancing out your food scraps in the compost pile.

Plan B involves paper and cardboard- be sure to avoid allowing tape to get in the mix or you’ll be picking it out later.

He mentions pine pellets- I’ve never tried these and I have no clue where a feed store is, but I’m going to look.  I’d suggest finding a wood shop instead and asking for their sawdust.

Piles that are sawdust intensive might not yield the best compost ever, but it will get the job done.

Good luck!

Kitchen Cone

I’d like to get one of these to try it out, but I don’t know why I’d take on the additional task of obtaining newsprint in order for the container to be structurally feasible.

I like the idea of not using a plastic or bioplastic bag, as I endorse this as well.  However, just don’t use a bag then!

I wash out my container after I empty it and have no issues.

Otherwise, I’m perfectly fine with either a Sure-Close or Yukchuk.

How to Compost in Small Spaces Using a Trash Can

One of the major factors keeping people from composting is a perceived lack of space.

I decided to create a simple trash can composter system to see how effective it is.

For just $20 and 15 minutes to drill the holes, I have a composting system that is equal in capacity to a pricey compost tumbler.

As long as you drill enough holes and pay attention to moisture levels, this composting method should work for people that only have a small yard, alleyway or perhaps a balcony to work with.

I’ll have more updates on this in the coming months…let me predict the future: it works!

 

Do Compost Piles Need to be Watered?

I just got back from a two week trip, and the first thing I thought about was ‘how are my compost systems doing?’

It ends up that things are pretty good.

It hasn’t rained here much, so I added water to my compost bins.

This is a new behavior for me- it’s normally stated as unnecessary to water compost systems, but I think this mostly applies to poorly designed compost systems that don’t have adequate aeration, therefore becoming that damp and smelly nightmare we’ve heard of but probably haven’t experienced.

My new trash can composting system (seen below) was looking pretty dried out.

The key reason: air holes.

trash can composter

This isn’t a big deal, and I’d rather have this situation than a soggy mess (not that that can’t be cured quickly as well).

I dumped in a full watering can’s worth before any moisture started coming out of the side holes… that’s saying something about how much water is craved by compost piles.

After watering my 2 compost bins and the trash can composter, I checked on the Worm Inn Mega system.

I was worried about them going two weeks without enough food or moisture, but luckily it worked out.

I simply gave them an extra large serving of food scraps and a fresh layer of new damp cardboard bedding before leaving on the trip.

Two weeks is a while for them though; as expected, they were all hunkered down in the middle of the system, so I made myself a huge kale/carrot/apple/ginger juice and gave them the remains.

The Worm Inn Mega springs back to life!

The extra space that this system provides over the original model came in handy for sure.

Are you composting yet?

I feel like the summer time is the most fun time for hot composting, but it’s also the most ridden with bugs if you’re not on top of your game.

Either way, get started!  It’s too easy.

Composting Made Simple.