Tag Archives: red wigglers

An indicator of a working compost pile… worms!

Looks like the trash can composter is doing well- red wigglers are reproducing here, meaning the environment is hospitable for them.

I water mine once a week (half a watering can) after I add my food scraps and cover with leaves.

A dry compost pile has a hard time working- keep it damp and you’ll keep it moving… and keep the worms around, too.

Collecting Worm Castings…and the Other Stuff, Too.

Emptying the Worm Inn vermicomposting system is a breeze- check out the gorgeous castings!  I don’t miss my old worm bin at all.

The contaminants are pretty funny, too- a few fruit labels, a shredded envelope window, and some uncrushed eggshells didn’t make it.

Sifting out the extras is easy when using a basket with 1/4″ to 1/2″ spacing.

Are you getting the results you’d like with your worm bin or outdoor composting system?

Lots and Lots of Worm Poop – Now What?

worm inn castings 1

It’s been six months since I’ve emptied the Worm Inn system– I admit I forgot about the worms for a bit, but now I have a ton of castings.

Every time I empty the Worm Inn, I’m always so impressed with the quality of the castings compared to the results from a standard worm bin.

When looking at the outlying “contaminants”, it’s like looking back in time at mistakes that were made- as you can see, I have a few!

worm inn castings + contaminants 2

  1. I’m such a stickler about removing labels from fruit, but I guess I wasn’t on a few occasions.  Luckily, these are easy to spot.

2. All those plastic shreds were clearly from an envelope that has a plastic window.  I like to shred my paper, but I must have shredded a whole junk mail envelope without looking inside to remove a return envelope.  Whoops!

3. I read everywhere that worms like crushed egg shells… clearly I haven’t tried that yet.  I’m going to crush these egg shells as fine as I can and then throw them back in.

The screening process is pretty easy- Empty the castings until some unprocessed food or worms pop up, then throw them back in the top of the system and zip up the bottom.

I have a wire basket that I dump the castings through, which removes the larger pieces.

The resulting materials are those excellent castings we all yearn for… if you’re having any challenges with vermicomposting, the Worm Inn really makes the whole process pretty easy.

Video to come shortly.  🙂

Summer Worm Composting: So Far, So Good

I’ve been enjoying the Worm Inn Mega this summer with no issues, and it’s simply due to having ample cover material.

The Worm Inn Mega is big enough for there to be plenty of cover material to begin with…you can really load it up to prevent flying pests and also keep the worms busy.

I actually have a hard time filling it up because the worms are just mowing through the material- Capacity really makes the whole process a lot easier.

I just realized that you might not have heard about this system…

Have you seen the Worm Inn Mega yet?  Check out my dorky review below for more information… this is my top recommendation for those of you out there looking to compost at home but lack the outdoor space.

Vermicomposting made simple.

Click here to learn more about the Worm Inn Mega system.

 

Is Indoor Composting a Good Idea?

After creating my video, I was shown a video of an indoor teracotta pot composting system in India that truly works…she’s a pro!

Check it out here:

While my video was referring specifically to a full sized compost bin or compost tumbler being set up indoors, which would be a mess… she’s circumvented that with the stacking kambha system.  I’m very tempted to re-create this system.

Give composting your best shot through the winter season- have some fun and get creative!

Thanks for watching!

A Brief Look at Different Vermicomposts

My vermicompost never looks as good as his does!

I tend to have stuff resembling the middle bin, but not even that fine.  I don’t tend to let mine cure…until now.

Now that we’re going into the winter (worm season), I’m going to really focus on coming up with some great stuff by the time spring comes around.

Bentley makes it look easy, doesn’t it?  If you ever have any questions on vermicomposting, be sure to check out redwormcomposting.com .  This dude lives it!

Compost for Spring: Leaves, Used Coffee Grounds, & Garden Waste (Leaf Compost)

Compost for Spring: Leaves, Used Coffee Grounds, & Garden Waste (Leaf Compost)

This time around, coffee grounds and sunchoke stalks are the main ingredients paired with leaves.

Since timing isn’t critical for obtaining finished compost, the leaves are unshredded.

Leaves are one of the few ingredients that compost on their own, so whether they’re shredded or not doesn’t matter…you’ll just get much quicker results by shredding them.

I like the hoop house idea for keeping the heat in and the worms warm…great video, Patrick!

Turning The Fall/Winter Compost & the Worms are Alright!

Turning The Fall/Winter Compost & the Worms are Alright!

In this later part of the video series, he gets the Geobin to start his next round of composting.

I really liked his homemade bin, so I was surprised he shelled out some cash to get a bin.

He mentioned wanting something portable, durable, mobile, and able to hold material easier.

I think it should live up to that quite well.

He also gets excited about red wigglers, which are always a nice surprise with large compost piles.

Although he had winter temperatures well below zero, he still had red wigglers survive… resilient creatures they are!