Tag Archives: worm bin

Worm Factory 360 review (video)

Worm Factory Review – Is it worth it?

When my friend told me he had a Worm Factory in his basement, I had to check it out.  Although I use a Worm Inn system, I definitely like how this system works, too.  Check the video for my on-the-spot observations!

When it comes to vermicomposting, I’m a big fan although it requires some attention to ensure the worms are happy.  I’ve made my own worm bins in the past, and then decided to focus my attention on the Worm Inn system: better airflow, easier harvesting of castings.

I kinda forgot about the Worm Factory 360.  It’s been on the market for a while now, but I never paid attention to it since I started with making my own bin anyway.

I was hanging out at my friend Brian’s house, and he wanted me to take a look at his worm system in the basement.  I had noticed a few flies in his house before he led me downstairs, and I figured they were from his Worm Factory…I was right.

I took a look around on some forums, and that seems to be a common issue with this thing- and now I see why.  Here’s a picture of his system:

Upon opening it up, right away I noticed that all the trays were not only full of castings, but they were full of friggin awesome castings.

I was impressed.  The castings were really moist, and that’s the thing with plastic…it doesn’t breathe well, if at all.  There are little gaps around the edges of the trays, maybe this is intentional to get some necessary airflow in there.

There were a lot of critters inside, indicating the system was alive and… well?  Maybe slightly out of balance- it was lacking cardboard.  Worms love cardboard, and I’m not sure if that’s scientifically been proven yet, but they like crawling in the corrugated tubes and I’ve read that the glue is tasty to them (can anyone confirm this?).

Besides taming the flies, the spigot seems to be the other design challenge.  Looking at the bottom tray, it was holding a significant amount of leachate because the castings were clogging up the spigot.  Makes sense.

What I didn’t expect was that although the bottom trays were all processed into castings, they still contained plenty of worms.  The worms seemed to go where they pleased (which is great and I’m happy for them), but I figured they’d all be in the top tray focused on eating the food.

How would I rate this thing?  Well, I only hung out with it (them) for about 10 minutes…but based on that, it exceeded my expectations.  I think they have the potential to be a really solid system with next to no issues, but you have to work a little bit for it.  Keep the dry materials coming into this thing and I think the castings/spigot/flies issues should become minimized.

If you’d like to learn more about one of these, I suggest clicking here to go to the company page on Amazon.  Plus, it’s always fun to read Amazon reviews, isn’t it?

Worm Factory 360 Review

When it comes to vermicomposting, I’m a big fan although it requires some attention to ensure the worms are happy.  I’ve made my own worm bins in the past, and then decided to focus my attention on the Worm Inn system: better airflow, easier harvesting of castings.

I kinda forgot about the Worm Factory 360.  It’s been on the market for a while now, but I never paid attention to it since I started with making my own bin anyway.

I was hanging out at my friend Brian’s house, and he wanted me to take a look at his worm system in the basement.  I had noticed a few flies in his house before he led me downstairs, and I figured they were from his Worm Factory…I was right.

I took a look around on some forums, and that seems to be a common issue with this thing- and now I see why.  Here’s a picture of his system:

Upon opening it up, right away I noticed that all the trays were not only full of castings, but they were full of friggin awesome castings.

I was impressed.  The castings were really moist, and that’s the thing with plastic…it doesn’t breathe well, if at all.  There are little gaps around the edges of the trays, maybe this is intentional to get some necessary airflow in there.

There were a lot of critters inside, indicating the system was alive and… well?  Maybe slightly out of balance- it was lacking cardboard.  Worms love cardboard, and I’m not sure if that’s scientifically been proven yet, but they like crawling in the corrugated tubes and I’ve read that the glue is tasty to them (can anyone confirm this?).

Besides taming the flies, the spigot seems to be the other design challenge.  Looking at the bottom tray, it was holding a significant amount of leachate because the castings were clogging up the spigot.  Makes sense.

What I didn’t expect was that although the bottom trays were all processed into castings, they still contained plenty of worms.  The worms seemed to go where they pleased (which is great and I’m happy for them), but I figured they’d all be in the top tray focused on eating the food.

How would I rate this thing?  Well, I only hung out with it (them) for about 10 minutes…but based on that, it exceeded my expectations.  I think they have the potential to be a really solid system with next to no issues, but you have to work a little bit for it.  Keep the dry materials coming into this thing and I think the castings/spigot/flies issues should become minimized.

If you’d like to learn more about one of these, I suggest clicking here to go to the company page on Amazon.  Plus, it’s always fun to read Amazon reviews, isn’t it?

Can Worms Compost Latex Condoms?

You may remember back in March/early April I decided to take my condom experiment from the compost tumbler to the worm bin.  Why?  …why not?

Worms are so quick to gobble through whatever waste is thrown at them…maybe they’ll eat latex?  Let’s take a look:

Can Worms Compost Latex Condoms?

The worms don’t seem too interested, do they?  And no, the experiment isn’t over yet.  I’m leaving the condoms in there.  It took my compost tumbler a good 9+ months to really get the condoms broken down in the slightest…I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s still plenty of pieces in there.  A small-scale backyard composting project isn’t going to produce crazy hot composting temperatures for a sustained period of time (which is definitely why my Sun Chips bag is still intact a good 10 months after putting it in).

I’m going to make a phone call to the local commercial composting facility and see how they react to the idea of composting latex…this should be fun.

Condoms in the Worm Bin: Update 2

It’s been about 6 weeks since I started the condoms-in-the-worm-bin experiment.

There’s not really much to report other than that the condoms are still in the bin.  They’re covered in springtails and what looks like mites.  I’ve caught worms sitting in them, but it’s a rarity and it’s definitely leading towards my initial guess.

It looks like the condoms will be there until the microbes eat them up.  Worms don’t appear to be all that attracted to natural latex…I don’t see any real munching marks on them.

Although it doesn’t seem like much, I’m still wagering that they’ll be degraded within a 6 month time frame.  What do you think?

All in all, who cares?  The fact that they didn’t drive my worms out of the bin is a small victory, I think.  At the end of all this, I’ll have a Youtube video showing the project from start to finish…what a fun project!

Condoms in the Worm Bin: Latex Love or Trojan Travesty?

You may remember a few months ago when I put expired latex condoms in my compost tumbler…eventually the microbes gobbled them up, and they are now gone.
How do you think worms will respond to them?  My worm bin is chock full of critters other than worms, so I think that even if the worms don’t want them, everything else in the bin will eat them over time.  Let’s find out.   Does this make me a bad father?
From left to right, we have the untouched condom, the barely tampered with condom, and then a shredded condom on the right:

What’s the point of this?  Honestly, I have no idea.  It’s not like everyone has expired (or used) condoms just sitting around waiting to compost.  Well, I’ll keep you posted on the progress and of course I’ll have a dorky video at the end of the process, too.

The Secret to Simple Vermicomposting: The Worm Inn

The #1 Secret to Simple Vermicomposting: The Worm Inn

The Worm Inn makes vermicomposting a no-brainer…it can handle more material, more effectively. Yep, it really is that simple.

The main difference between the Worm Inn and a plastic bin is the breathability… no matter how many holes you drill in a plastic bin, it won’t equal the awesomeness of a Cordura sack. Now, I’m not hating on plastic bins by any means…they’re great to get a handle on the process and they do work. However, you’ll be able to process a lot more waste with the Inn, plain and simple.

The other main factor, while not as important to me as you hardcore gardeners, is the castings. Plastic bins are obviously not easy to work with, while the Inn is as simple as opening a drawstring. I’ll be posting videos on this in the coming months for sure. As I said before, I will be giving gardening a try this year although i have no space. Which is another reason I love vermicomposting…anyone in the smallest living situation can use one of these and handle their waste with ease.

Getting started with the Worm Inn Pt. 2

So today I completed the Worm Inn, and I didn’t even use the stand anyway.

I went out and got the piping to build the stand, spent the time cutting it with my new vise that I hardly use, and had a lot of fun doing it.  While I was cutting it, I realized that I don’t really need it.  Hanging it from the ceiling was cool enough, and then I found a killer spot for it:

BAM!  So good.  This area of my basement was filled with junk, and now it’s transformed into my waste processing station.  How cool is that?  So now I’m left with a stand…who wants it?

My review of the Worm Inn can be found HERE.

Getting started with the Worm Inn Pt. 1

All right, I can’t wait any longer.

I should have a review up by the end of this weekend (Review can be found by clicking HERE).  Get this: With my order I got the optional stand kit which consists of corners and zipties, and then you go to your local hardware store for the 3/4″ pipe lengths (It makes shipping easier for the Worm Inn guy).  I went to two hardware stores, and neither would cut the pipe into the lengths I needed.

My advice for you bikers out there, is to have someone drive you so you can pick up the 10′ long pipes, or take a hacksaw and tape measure with you and cut the pieces on your own outside the building.  I, of course, did neither so now I’m stuck waiting impatiently for tomorrow so I can get the pieces and get this thing rolling.

In the meantime, I hung it from my ceiling, and now I’m wondering if I even want the stand anyway… what do you think?  It kinda takes up more space, but at the same time it’s doing its job:

Eh, I’m in no hurry to get the piping now… this thing rules either way.  Major thumbs up for ease of setup and use.

Worm Inn review coming soon…

I started realizing how much I miss composting outside as we’ve had a lot of frigid, crappy weather over the last week or two.  The worms have really become friends of mine… I like to put my ear right up to the surface and listen to them wriggle around and munch.

I also noticed that being a household of one, I still feel like I can overwhelm my worm bin at times…so what should I do?  Order a Worm Inn and another pound of red wigglers, that’s what.  I heard about the Worm Inn from Bentley Christie of course, and I was instantly curious:

Check out Bentley’s Worm Inn overfeeding video series starting here… I was sold!  Yes, he’s being deliberately obnoxious with the amount of material he’s putting in, but nonetheless they gobble through it with no issues.

Worm Inn Vermicomposting System

There’s plenty of advantages to using the Worm Inn that I’ve observed…I’m not a worm bin hater by any means, but it’s pretty obvious that they don’t get the proper aeration that a cordura sack does.  What’s cool about these, is that they also retain moisture and let worm castings drop out of the bottom…in a worm bin, you’re digging around and the results are a bit soggy.

Again, bins are great too…I just built a few as gifts for people to try out.  However, I need to step my game up as I’d like to use the castings and also be able to process more material.

I will definitely have a (nerdy) product review of the Inn to share with you as soon as I get it (CLICK HERE for review).  Other videos in the pipeline include observing how the worms felt about eating condoms, creating a compost sieve, adding dog food to your compost, and a series of digging through other people’s trash looking for compostable opportunities.

Until next time, keep it dirty!  And stay warm.

a quick worm update.

I haven’t fed the worms in over two weeks, now they’re finally starting to show their faces a bit more each time I open the lid… they’re eating away from their castings and towards the surface.  As of yet, they haven’t chowed down on the condom I put in there, but the mites/springtails are all over it.

While cutting a tomato into smaller pieces over top of the worm bin, my dumb ass cut my finger.  I hope they like blood.  Whatever.

I’m so psyched for the spring so I can put some of my worms into the compost tumbler… winter sucks.