Tag Archives: worm castings

More Worm Castings, Less Contaminants

Well that was quick- another big tray of worm castings.  The yellow bin is what I pulled yesterday, and the blue tub is my main container.

Recently I posted all the contaminants I found in my last batch– this time was much better, but I still missed a few fruit labels.

Quite an improvement over the last batch!

 

Collecting Worm Castings…and the Other Stuff, Too.

Emptying the Worm Inn vermicomposting system is a breeze- check out the gorgeous castings!  I don’t miss my old worm bin at all.

The contaminants are pretty funny, too- a few fruit labels, a shredded envelope window, and some uncrushed eggshells didn’t make it.

Sifting out the extras is easy when using a basket with 1/4″ to 1/2″ spacing.

Are you getting the results you’d like with your worm bin or outdoor composting system?

Lots and Lots of Worm Poop – Now What?

worm inn castings 1

It’s been six months since I’ve emptied the Worm Inn system– I admit I forgot about the worms for a bit, but now I have a ton of castings.

Every time I empty the Worm Inn, I’m always so impressed with the quality of the castings compared to the results from a standard worm bin.

When looking at the outlying “contaminants”, it’s like looking back in time at mistakes that were made- as you can see, I have a few!

worm inn castings + contaminants 2

  1. I’m such a stickler about removing labels from fruit, but I guess I wasn’t on a few occasions.  Luckily, these are easy to spot.

2. All those plastic shreds were clearly from an envelope that has a plastic window.  I like to shred my paper, but I must have shredded a whole junk mail envelope without looking inside to remove a return envelope.  Whoops!

3. I read everywhere that worms like crushed egg shells… clearly I haven’t tried that yet.  I’m going to crush these egg shells as fine as I can and then throw them back in.

The screening process is pretty easy- Empty the castings until some unprocessed food or worms pop up, then throw them back in the top of the system and zip up the bottom.

I have a wire basket that I dump the castings through, which removes the larger pieces.

The resulting materials are those excellent castings we all yearn for… if you’re having any challenges with vermicomposting, the Worm Inn really makes the whole process pretty easy.

Video to come shortly.  🙂

A Brief Look at Different Vermicomposts

My vermicompost never looks as good as his does!

I tend to have stuff resembling the middle bin, but not even that fine.  I don’t tend to let mine cure…until now.

Now that we’re going into the winter (worm season), I’m going to really focus on coming up with some great stuff by the time spring comes around.

Bentley makes it look easy, doesn’t it?  If you ever have any questions on vermicomposting, be sure to check out redwormcomposting.com .  This dude lives it!

Worm Inn MEGA Review

Worm Inn MEGA Review

The Worm Inn MEGA is the latest improvement on the original Worm Inn system.

With this system you can turn huge quantities of organic materials into worm castings fairly quickly, without the hassle.

Simply add a layer of shredded cardboard, some shredded paper, a dash of leaves and of course food scraps.  Let the material sit for a week while you order the red wiggler worms for the system.  Anywhere from 3-5 pounds will do.

From there, it’s as easy as adding your food scraps each week and removing fresh castings from the bottom via the drawstring opening.

This system reigns superior over the others simply due to its huge capacity in a footprint of just 20″ x 20″ and its exceptional airflow which prevents it from getting oversaturated.

If you aren’t working with a lot of space and want to compost year round, the Worm Inn MEGA can really make it happen for you.

How to Screen Worm Compost (video)

How to Screen Worm Compost

Here’s a neat video on how to screen worm compost.  Cassandra keeps it simple in this video and has some nice results.  I do pretty much the same thing, except my screen is a repurposed basket with a piece of wire mesh placed in the bottom.

She makes mention of running a fan over the top of the castings when you first harvest them…it’s true- when you first remove your castings and put the worms back, the stuff is so gooey that a screen doesn’t work so well.  Drying them out just a bit will help, although I wouldn’t want to dry them too much and risk losing some of their benefit.