Tag Archives: worm inn

Collecting Worm Castings…and the Other Stuff, Too.

Emptying the Worm Inn vermicomposting system is a breeze- check out the gorgeous castings!  I don’t miss my old worm bin at all.

The contaminants are pretty funny, too- a few fruit labels, a shredded envelope window, and some uncrushed eggshells didn’t make it.

Sifting out the extras is easy when using a basket with 1/4″ to 1/2″ spacing.

Are you getting the results you’d like with your worm bin or outdoor composting system?

Lots and Lots of Worm Poop – Now What?

worm inn castings 1

It’s been six months since I’ve emptied the Worm Inn system– I admit I forgot about the worms for a bit, but now I have a ton of castings.

Every time I empty the Worm Inn, I’m always so impressed with the quality of the castings compared to the results from a standard worm bin.

When looking at the outlying “contaminants”, it’s like looking back in time at mistakes that were made- as you can see, I have a few!

worm inn castings + contaminants 2

  1. I’m such a stickler about removing labels from fruit, but I guess I wasn’t on a few occasions.  Luckily, these are easy to spot.

2. All those plastic shreds were clearly from an envelope that has a plastic window.  I like to shred my paper, but I must have shredded a whole junk mail envelope without looking inside to remove a return envelope.  Whoops!

3. I read everywhere that worms like crushed egg shells… clearly I haven’t tried that yet.  I’m going to crush these egg shells as fine as I can and then throw them back in.

The screening process is pretty easy- Empty the castings until some unprocessed food or worms pop up, then throw them back in the top of the system and zip up the bottom.

I have a wire basket that I dump the castings through, which removes the larger pieces.

The resulting materials are those excellent castings we all yearn for… if you’re having any challenges with vermicomposting, the Worm Inn really makes the whole process pretty easy.

Video to come shortly.  🙂

Summer Worm Composting: So Far, So Good

I’ve been enjoying the Worm Inn Mega this summer with no issues, and it’s simply due to having ample cover material.

The Worm Inn Mega is big enough for there to be plenty of cover material to begin with…you can really load it up to prevent flying pests and also keep the worms busy.

I actually have a hard time filling it up because the worms are just mowing through the material- Capacity really makes the whole process a lot easier.

I just realized that you might not have heard about this system…

Have you seen the Worm Inn Mega yet?  Check out my dorky review below for more information… this is my top recommendation for those of you out there looking to compost at home but lack the outdoor space.

Vermicomposting made simple.

Click here to learn more about the Worm Inn Mega system.

 

How to Add Bedding to a Worm Bin

Here’s my quick tips for how to add food scraps and a new layer of bedding to your worm system.  The key is to keep your food scraps covered with damp bedding.

Here’s how a worm system dying for new material looks:

1. worm inn-before

1) Fill bucket with cardboard.  I have about half a bucket here, which is enough for my Worm Inn Mega.

2. cardboard in bucket

2) Add enough water to submerge all the cardboard…you’ll notice it only takes an inch of water…cardboard shrivels up significantly when you push down on it.

3. soaked cardboard in bucket

3) Let the cardboard soak.  I made a smoothie while I waited.  Drain out the excess water.

4. drained cardboard & juicer waste

4) Add your food scraps first, followed by your damp bedding.  This is key!  You want the bedding to cover your food scraps entirely to minimize any flying pests or odors.

5. fresh bedding in worm inn

There you have it- your worms are happy with new food, and damp bedding to crawl around in (and also eat).

Do Compost Piles Need to be Watered?

I just got back from a two week trip, and the first thing I thought about was ‘how are my compost systems doing?’

It ends up that things are pretty good.

It hasn’t rained here much, so I added water to my compost bins.

This is a new behavior for me- it’s normally stated as unnecessary to water compost systems, but I think this mostly applies to poorly designed compost systems that don’t have adequate aeration, therefore becoming that damp and smelly nightmare we’ve heard of but probably haven’t experienced.

My new trash can composting system (seen below) was looking pretty dried out.

The key reason: air holes.

trash can composter

This isn’t a big deal, and I’d rather have this situation than a soggy mess (not that that can’t be cured quickly as well).

I dumped in a full watering can’s worth before any moisture started coming out of the side holes… that’s saying something about how much water is craved by compost piles.

After watering my 2 compost bins and the trash can composter, I checked on the Worm Inn Mega system.

I was worried about them going two weeks without enough food or moisture, but luckily it worked out.

I simply gave them an extra large serving of food scraps and a fresh layer of new damp cardboard bedding before leaving on the trip.

Two weeks is a while for them though; as expected, they were all hunkered down in the middle of the system, so I made myself a huge kale/carrot/apple/ginger juice and gave them the remains.

The Worm Inn Mega springs back to life!

The extra space that this system provides over the original model came in handy for sure.

Are you composting yet?

I feel like the summer time is the most fun time for hot composting, but it’s also the most ridden with bugs if you’re not on top of your game.

Either way, get started!  It’s too easy.

The Worms Say Hi

worm inn mega wormsI just cleared out the remainder of my produce in the fridge and made a kale/carrot/apple/ginger/cucumber/spirulina/cardboard smoothie.

Over the last few months, I’ve refined what I give the worms to mostly juicer waste and a fair bit of dampened cardboard as a cover material.

I’ve definitely seen them become more plump and/or healthy looking in general.

I got worried for a bit when I was focusing on my compost toilet efforts a bit obsessively through the winter to ensure my pile cooked through the near zero degree temperatures.

Now that the pile is killing off every pathogen in sight by maintaining a constant 120-130F, I can give the worms their deserved attention.

Since I neglected them, I’m just keeping it simple with juicer waste… I feel like it definitely revitalized the population.

Beforehand, I was throwing all kinds of crap at them such as wax paper and other paper products that most likely had a plastic liner embedded in them.

Of course, the worms didn’t like that junk and hunkered down far away from the stuff and didn’t appear healthy.

Material size/surface area definitely matters.  Eliminating plastic content really makes them happy, too.

I’m a pretty boring eater- I’ve eaten roughly five different things in rotation all the time for as long as I can remember.

I don’t know if the worms hate me for it, but I’m keeping their diet equally boring and watching them stay healthy instead of throwing curves and feeling weird about it.

Welcome back, worms!

…and if you’re not familiar with the Worm Inn Mega, check it out here.  It’s the most forgiving, easy-to-use worm system you’ll ever find…